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Etiquette for video conferences

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Etiquette for video conferences

Bravis News

Video broadcasts in HD quality are a great thing when documents such as design or construction drawings or computer tomographies have to be evaluated, or possibly processed on a group basis by participants at spatially separate locations. "HD quality can rapidly be lost, however" as explained by André Röhrig, director of BRAVIS
International GmbH from Cottbus, "if participants sit in front of the webcam - in their home office for instance - looking scruffy or wearing the wrong outfit." And that is far from being the only faux pas that people can make. Above all else, it is decisive for the success of a video conference (VC) that all of the participants can be easily understood. This should be consistently ensured at the start of a VC in order to avoid subsequent disturbances.

Not speaking too quickly, but articulating well; always allowing partners to put their point across and not interrupting - these are additional rules that should be followed. Another thing of importance is maintaining eye contact with the participants during the VC - the camera positions should also be checked before the start under all circumstances.

Another key aspect in terms of the success is the video conference system technology. Here, the following applies: the easier it is to use, the better. "When developing BRAVIS 2.1, we keenly focused on ensuring intuitive ease of use", explains Röhrig, before then adding: "But not to the detriment of necessary features such as application
sharing or the virtual whiteboard!"

Another key aspect in terms of the success is the video conference system technology. Here, the following applies: the easier it is to use, the better. "When developing BRAVIS 2.1, we keenly focused on ensuring intuitive ease of use", explains Röhrig, before then adding: "But not to the detriment of necessary features such as application
sharing or the virtual whiteboard!"

And another thing which comes across as unprofessional is not having required documents at hand to assist discussions with colleagues or business partners. Another absolute no-go are diversions and annoyances in the background. These include any amount of unsuitable wall decorations (there’s nothing wrong with Pirelli calendars - but they shouldn’t be in a VC), background noise from radios or pets running about in home office environments, or colleagues who ’want to quickly get their face on camera’ in the office environment. Posting a "Do not disturb" sign on the door can help to prevent the latter.

"Telekom has recently published some tongue-in-cheek rules of etiquette that are easy to understand", adds André Röhrig. Their department for user-oriented research and innovation has recently published a study with the title "eETIQUETTE@WORK - Empfehlungen für die Zusammenarbeit in der digitalen Welt" (Etiquette at work, recommendations for cooperating in the digital world) which was created on the basis of an interdisciplinary collaboration of lead users, ergonomists and experts from the industry, the knowledge society and digital bohemianism.

Some examples from the study:
"An express train in your ear? Think about your listeners and use the mute function
... when you’re on the move."
"How’s it going?" also goes for communications online. There’s always another person
sitting at the end of the line."
"Communication isn’t a one way street. Give others a change to talk - and that means
online as well."
"Googling before a first date is a no-go; but before meetings with experts, it’s a doso!"



Downloads:

Press release 12- Etiquette for video conferences (PDF 24,30 KB)

References

Eiffel Stahltechnologien

Temmler Pharma

Eiffel Stahltechnologien

Digital Design Cottbus

WSN Sicherheit und Service GmbH